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Custom Red Rod is Backbone of Rojas’s Froggin Success

It would not be an exaggeration to say that Dean Rojas uses his custom designed Quantum “frog rod” to feed his family. He’s a professional angler. His job is to catch bass, and Rojas estimates that 60% of the bass he brings to weigh-in are caught on his new red-colored Quantum frog rod (model TDRC7067F).

It’s fair to say Rojas’ dependency on topwater frogs, and his realization that he needed the perfect rod and reel for throwing them occurred about 2002 when an elder buddy showed him how far he could skip a topwater frog underneath over-hanging cover at Lake Havasu. Rojas says the man was nearly as fascinated by his ability to skip the frog – as he was the actual act of catching the bass.

“The 2004 Bassmaster Classic let our Lake Havasu secret out of the bag,” said Rojas. Half-a-million avid bassers sat on their sofas in amazement as Rojas skipped his Spro-branded frog into super thick trees along Lake Wylie’s shoreline.

Few realized you could cast – let alone catch – bass on a topwater frog in that thick of cover. And that’s where the importance of the rod Rojas uses becomes so important.

“The rod I designed with Quantum (model TDRC7067F) has a very soft and flexible tip, but after the first 10 it turns into a broomstick. You have to have a lot of flex in the tip in order to skip Kermit way back into and under the cover – but – when you get a bite, you better have a lot of lumber to get the fish from the thick cover. Most rods have either soft tips or thick blanks – but few do a good job of combining the two like this one does,” explains Rojas.

Like any highly refined craft, a few key tools are required beyond the rod. “I use 65-pound braid, and a 7.0:1 Burner reel. It’s imperative that you use that Quantum Burner reel because slower reels can’t keep up with ‘frog fish’ that run toward the boat after they bite. You gotta be able to keep up with them or they’ll get off,” exclaims Rojas.

“Trust me. I can catch bass on a frog in water as cold as 48 degrees. I can catch them in dirty water, clean water, and all types of shallow habitat. But you can’t cast them, let alone catch them, if you don’t have the right rod and reel.”

We trust you Dean – it’s how you make your living.